Find Location Telemedicine Pay Online

Is It the Flu?

When to Come to Urgent Care

This season our nation has seen one of the craziest flu outbreaks since the Center for Disease Control, CDC, began to track it back in 2008. When symptoms hit your house, it’s sometimes hard to know when to stay home and just take it easy, or come in to urgent care?

Flu Symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Feverish Chills
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Headaches
  • Tiredness
  • Vomit and Diarrhea are normal among children and older patients 

Flu symptoms show differently in every person and appear suddenly, usually within a matter of hours. Often, when someone comes down with the flu people can recover from home by staying away from people and receiving medical care when needed. Flu-like symptoms tend to go away within a few days to less than two weeks if symptoms do not worsen.

The CDC advises to seek urgent care when a person has “the emergency warning signs of flu sickness.” What are emergency warning signs? Here is the list found in the Center for the Disease Control website:

Emergency Warning Signs

In Children

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash
  • Additional emergency warning signs for infants would be:
    • Being unable to eat
    • Having trouble breathing
    • Having no tears when crying
    • Significantly fewer wet diapers than normal

In Adults:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough

These are emergency warning signs but if someone is at a high risk of flu-related complications it is important for that person to seek medical help immediately. People who are at high risk for flu-related complications are listed below: 

  • Asthma
  • Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions
  • Blood disorders
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Heart Disease
  • Kidney disorders
  • Liver disorders
  • Metabolic disorders
  • People who are obese with a body mass index [BMI] of 40 or higher
  • People younger than 19 years of age on long-term aspirin therapy
  • People with a weakened immune system due to disease or medication

Other people who are at risk:

  • Adults 65 years and older
  • Children under 5 years old, but especially children under 2 years old
  • Women who are pregnant up until two weeks after the end of their pregnancy
  • Native Americans and Alaska Natives
  • People living in nursing homes and long-term care facilities

If someone has flu-like symptoms and falls under a category for complications it is best for them to seek medical help immediately. Your iCare Urgent Care has convenient locations in Frisco and Southwest Fort Worth, with minimal wait times. Our Urgent Care is In Network with most major insurances, so your trip to Urgent Care isn’t a burden on your time or your wallet. 

This flu season has been one of the craziest outbreaks in a while. With some precaution and care, it is possible to come out of this flu season strong and as healthy as possible. Always keep your health first. We are here to support you and help you anytime your symptoms require it. 

Sources:

  • “Influenza (Flu).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Jan. 2018, www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm.
  • “Influenza (Flu).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Jan. 2018, www.cdc.gov/flu/antivirals/whatyoushould.htm.
  • “Influenza (Flu).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 May 2016, www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/complications.htm.
  • “Influenza (Flu).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 24 Jan. 2018, www.cdc.gov/flu/takingcare.htm.

* All information subject to change. Images may contain models. Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary.